As we embrace new technologies, we must also learn how to optimize for them. Outbound, or external, links are links pointing outwards from your site to another website. They pass along some of your own site’s ranking power. You need to migrate your website from one host to another, or one platform to another, even to a fresh domain. Website migrations are one of the most complicated aspects of any SEO campaign. There is no single place to focus when trying to optimize a website for search engines, so it is important to make updates and upgrades to various parts of a website at regular intervals, not spending too much time or effort on any particular aspect of the website while other features get ignored or underserved.

Panda 4.2 as core ranking algorithm

This change has brought a revolution in the marketing industry. Infographics are everywhere. Some good Get your arithmetic correct - the primary resources are all available here. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or something like that... - some bad. But most creators don't stop to think how to make sure search engines can understand their infographic - or how people who can't see pictures can consume them (maybe because they rely on screen readers or have chosen not to download images to their mobile phone). Most marketers who specialise in other areas tend to forget that social media management is completely different. Technical SEO refers to the technical aspects of on-page SEO like site speed, indexability, and mobile responsiveness. The term “technical” can turn a lot of people away from this aspect of SEO. Don’t let it scare you! It is not nearly as intimidating as it sounds.

Provide value information rooted in your initial strategy and use user generated content as part of this

What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes. TV ads, radio, print and even social media). We are farmers, not butchers. Always think about the user and why they are visiting your site in the first place.

Think like a human not a robot when it comes to page impressions

Like titles, search engines typically give headings a higher priority. Clear headings that describe the content that follows make it easier for search engines to detect the major themes of your site. As a site owner, analytics are the key to a clear visual of the impact your website currently has. By analyzing both your own data as well as big data sets online and competitor data sets, you can not only improve your own site but also find insight into what your demographic wants, what companies are flourishing, and how they are flourishing likewise. It is fluff and filler content that has often times been stuffed to the brim with as many keywords as possible in a hollow effort to rank on the first page for a topic. We asked an SEO Specialist, Gaz Hall, from SEO York for his thoughts on the matter: "When people search for information online, they’re looking for content that will satisfy whatever need they may have."

Establish intuitive information architecture by considering bounce rates

When improving your page speed, you should always ask yourself if you need all these assets, libraries, images, plugins, theme features and so on. The famous saying “less is more” is still as valuable as ever. With I'm always shocked by Marketing Beverley, in this regard. more businesses than ever taking advantage of the online marketplace as an effective way to present their products or services, engage with their customers or even to encourage awareness of their brand identity – it has never been as important in this fast-growing online world that they are able carve out their own niche in order to be successful. As Google has become quicker in catching webmasters who use unethical SEO practices and has implemented harsher punishments for offenders (lower rankings or banning of websites, etc.). Some companies desperate for improved search rankings have found ways to hack into the websites of competitors and implement some nasty strategies on those sites. Rather than default to a generic, automatically-generated URL, take time to think about how users would search for your content and include one of those phrases in your URL. Separate words with hyphens to make the words in the phrase clear to users and search engines. Avoid smushing all the words together.